In Pictures: My Village Life

EXPERIENCE

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VILLAGE LIFESTYLE

A snapshot of what life is like in the village. A simple way of life that wanna keeps me going back home

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akamau

What I love about going back home

Who wouldn’t love to go home? There is no place like home and home is where our heart is truly defines how each person or individual belongs to. Being happy, comfortable and relax is a place where you feel like at home and that is something above and beyond. 

For the last few decades, going back home to the village had long been a much-loved holiday destination when I could relax and enjoy a break from the 9-to-5 grind back home. The dream of getting off the hamster wheel of working life and take a short break from home away from home, the village life in Papua New Guinea. It was time to go back home and that was exactly what I did. I know it was going to be a culture shock for me going back but mainly for me, I miss the proximity with my families back home, especially after living overseas for almost 30 years, now families at home have grown up children and engaging in so many things. It was the greatest moment for me, seeing them for the first time.

During the few years of my absence from the village and when I went back home to the village, my camera has never been so busy. The village life there has been definitely an eye-opener; the delightful people, the breathtaking scenery, the vibrant village community gatherings, simple and relaxed way of life… Every day there was so many photo worthy moments. Sometimes, it is true that a picture can paint a thousand words. Each picture tells a story of a certain place and time. In my opinion, there is no place on earth that a simple photo can tell so much about a place than Inuma Village. Here are just a few of my favourites. 

Home

The life here in this tiny remote village of Inuma is much simpler than Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea and a lot more easier and relaxed way of life. You can go to the rivers, swim, gardens, bush walking and hunting. You can simply indulge in a stress and trouble free atmosphere.

The village isn’t big and I love it. I enjoyed traditional home-cooked meals on the fire and went for night swims in the river just within two minutes walk from the backyard of the house. I am so lucky enough to have this village located near the river, the main highway and accessible to many simple way of living without spending a cent. It is simply a beautiful area.

Village way of Life

For me, by far the most amazing thing about going back to the village is the way the local people live and how I have blended within the village lifestyle. Having grown up in this village, I still now feel that I am much more a part of their lives. I was lucky enough to witness a village community work progress during my visit in the village. Depending on the work but usually they complete the task within the day when the whole village community coming out to help the whole time but usually they all have their own individual or family gardens that they survive on. They’re bright, noisy affairs and a whole lot of fun too. I must say, the whole atmosphere was electrifying.

Faces

The faces of families back home tells a story. Despite modernisation and the threat to their way of life, especially their way of doing things to survive is gradually changing but their beautiful smiles are always cancerous and unforgetable. They still continue to live the way they have for centuries and they are happy. Here are some of my favourites. 

Family Fun Experience

Telling my friends that I was going home was a huge wake-up call for me as most of my friends in Australia know very little about village way of life. However, sharing some of experiences like this opens up a whole new world to many. I hope to go back again and spent more time in the village. The highlight of my entire trip was spending time with my families and at the river as kids go about diving above waste-deep waters for prawns for my lunch as we made fires at each site near the river while enjoying my prawns with dry coconut on the menu. Most of the children were happy to get fresh coconut for my refreshment and the entire experience was far better than I first thought. I simply fell in love with the beauty, pristine and untouched environment. It was absolutely extraordinary and like no place on earth to experience this unique way of life.

Road to Port Moresby: Maggi Highway

The trip back from the village to Port Moresby, capital of Papua New Guinea was an experience that won’t be forgotten easily and without a doubt, it was an experience I want to repeat again – that was jumping on any public motor vehicle (PMV) passing along the highway. It was a rough journey but will do it again whenever I go back for a visit.

The road to Port Moresby from the village is probably the least treacherous, however, that doesn’t mean it isn’t one of the most dangerous roads in the world. I found that, when it comes to driving the Maggi Highway, it is the journey, not the destination, that is the main attraction on travelling on public motor vehicles. There are few words that I can describe the beauty of this drive – rough and dusty road, windy, ever-changing green and lush valleys and passing through many tiny villages. There is only one town along the highway which is less attractive compared to tiny outback towns in Australia which are well-maintained with clean facilities and respected shops. To me this was the experience I wanted to discover – a highway to heaven itself. To others, experiencing and exploring this highway is certainly not for everyone. If you rather sit back, relax and simply enjoy the comfort – travel on your own vehicle.

The trip back home can be describe in one simple word – Incredible. I loved my trip and what truly made the difference was my sister, nephew, brother-in-law and my families back home in the village. Without them, this would have made the trip un-extraordinary. I have seen and experience the lifestyle in just few days and that was just only one small part of it. It was incredibly amazing experience.

ABOUT ME


ic.golina

Papua New Guinean living in Cairns, Australia. Weekend getaway adventurer and Free-Independent-Traveller (FIT). Lover of unique and exotic travel experiences with a touch of luxury. Follow me to my travel world, brining you closer to your destination.

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Spending little time in remote school in Inuma Village

EXPERIENCE

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inuma village remote school

Experience remote school environment with no electricity, no concrete floors and lack of simple facilities

Posted by

akamau

Inuma Village in Brief

In the deep south of the Magi Highway, away from the city of Port Moresby, you will find Inuma village, a tiny remote village located beside the highway is a place where time is seen differently from the western way of life. This village is located in central province in Papua New Guinea and about two to three hours drive out of Port Moresby. Untouched by mass development, this village is a place where you can still see and feel the real remote village lifestyle. Inuma village landscape is a diverse mixture of earthy agriculture, wide open spaces with untouched and minimal farming activities and some of the most beautiful natural forest with amazing scenery you have ever laid eyes on. 

A small village with a population of approximately 100 people living permanently in the village makes it one of the most friendliest and hospitable village you ever come across in this part of the world. Most of the people who are employed live in the nation’s capital, Port Moresby make their occasional trips back to the village during special occasions or holidays.

Inuma village

Why Go?

In 2013, I returned to the village where I grew up as a child to visit families but it was a life-changing trip for me. Whilst I was there, I turned my attention to village school to find out more about schools in remote areas in the region, especially, the elementary school in Inuma village. The elementary school in remote communities was introduced by the Papua New Guinea government for number of years. This system of education was to provide opportunities for communities living in remote areas to have access to the importance of education. I wanted to observe how this system had progressed in this tiny village school – Inuma. Despite having traveled quite a bit, there was something truly magical and mind-blowing about remote schools. I had never visited anything quite like it before. The people in remote areas live in wide open space with abundance of food surrounded by tropical flora and fauna but there is a lack of infrastructure in schools. Seeing these happy faces truly touched my soul. 

Faces of students at Inuma village school

Getting there?

My journey began with a two to three hour drive south of the city of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. The road leading out of the city, the Magi Highway wasn’t smooth as expected. Most of the road is bitumen but is rough and deeply pot-holed. This rough and pot-holed roads are visible and commonly recognisable both in urban and rural areas throughout the country. As we drove along the highway, we went through many beautiful remote villages one after the another. Throughout the country, where many of its people live in remote villages have little or no access to education. About 90% of people living in remote villages don’t know how to read and write. For those who are privileged, many times, we have taken education for granted.

Visiting the Inuma elementary school was one of my best experiences I ever had. The school is located in the heart of the village next to the village church building. The church building architecturally designed is built with modern building materials is visibly noticeable from the distance. The school classroom built with simple structure has corrugated iron roof supported by eight wooden poles with no built-in walls and no concrete floors. The school desks are made from local timbers, laid out sequently on earth-floor for students to use.

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The schools in remote areas throughout the country are under-resourced with very little or hardly any facilities compared to any typical urban schools in the city. However, one of the highlights of my visit which amazes as I took time to process and digest these cancerous corruption with the education system was the power of the children that I had come in contact with. For children who live and attend schools in remote areas like the Inuma village, the teaching standards and learning facilities are very poor. Sadly, all schools have similar experiences throughout the remotes areas of the country. Teaching in remote schools is a commitment and it is not for everyone. The conditions can be very challenging. However, it is a unique experience and can be immensely rewarding, offering a lifestyle you may never get to experience working in cities.

It was no surprise to me that many of the children come from under-privileged family backgrounds with either parents having no formal education nor employed. Many based themselves in the village to be subsistence farmers. Many of them come to the city to sell their surplus of goods or on the side of the road to pay for their children’s education and buy other items that they need.

This is the lifestyle that I found myself in a very familiar situation which I am no stranger to it. This is where I began my childhood journey and is still very green in my mind. Taking time to visit school like this in remote areas, is no stranger to me compared to what I have seen in some of the schools in most poorest countries in the world. Many of the schools in remote areas have dilapidated ammenities, crowded schools and uneven ratio of students per teacher. Though they lack many of the vital facilities, the children are happy and their cancerous smiles are priceless.

Faces of students at Inuma village school

These challenges children face in remote areas at home are varied. With parents lack of formal education creates a big gap for a child to further their knowledge and help at home. Most of the remote villages have no electricity, nor running taps. It is a common problem felt across developing countries and the strain in remote areas is acute. The schools in rural areas often operate out of single classroom or in unsafe buildings and the teachers are under-paid and trained.

From what I have seen and observed, the children are happy and always eager to learn. They have the luxury of freedom and the breath of fresh air goes a long way. They may struggle but their way of life, surrounded with rich natural environment creates an atmosphere where everything is worthless. It is definitely a place for adventure travellers paradise. 

Spending time with these children was the best part of my experience. All of these children belong to my immediate and extended families, This is what I have come to see and learn. Sadly, what I have seen with children’s standard of learning with limited resources created an environment that is depression but everyone seems to be so happy and free. It is a place where the children and community see it as a norm – A lifestyle they become accustom to from their worldview.

ABOUT ME


ic.golina

Papua New Guinean living in Cairns, Australia. Weekend getaway adventurer and Free-Independent-Traveller (FIT). Lover of unique and exotic travel experiences with a touch of luxury. Follow me to my travel world, brining you closer to your destination.

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Living well with Grief

Almost 10 years on

It is hard to believe that someone that you have spend almost your entire life with is suddenly gone, you find various avenues for your emotional release and finding various ways of dealing with loss. It is something that each individual had to fight alone.

Dealing with Loss and Grief

No one can truly appreciate the uniqueness of the journey each of us take when learning to live without either your child, father, mother, wife, husband and parents or soul mate of many years.

Life Adjustment

For my personal experience, time has not healed but it has certainly modified my pain and loneliness. They say, time heals and it has definitely allowed me to slowly adjust to the ‘new living arrangements’ and has given me a chance to reassess my life from another perspective – trying everything on your own. This is not a simple process and one has to take time but over time, you will become stronger – a strengthening process that will continue to give you burst of confidence and ownership of your new life.

Let it Go

For me, I have finally learn to “Let it Go” of what I couldn’t control. It is difficult but we need to press on with what we need to do, can do and enjoy doing it. As the saying goes, it is vitally OK to spoil ourselves and most importably, be kind to our own body.

I have found it necessary to take time out when I needed to and allow the memories that sneak out of my eyes and roll down my cheeks to flow without interruption. It is healthy to respond to sorrow in this way; real friends will be happy to join you in times of your need.

Doing things on your own

As time went on, I realised that I was totally responsible for myself. That is when I choose not to become a burden to anyone, including me. I had to go for regular exercise, ate healthy food intake, re-energised my sleep, wonderful family time, having fun with fun friends, being creative and proactive. At the same time,  spent time alone for reflection especially out in nature, are all very important for our soul. Life is still so precious and there is so much to live for. We all have unique gifts to share.

Understanding of others

You got to experience it to know it. For those who have mourned have reached a new and greater understanding of love and how priceless it is. Our journeys have given us greater empathy and sensitivity, especially to others who mourn. We have greater compassion now, and can connect with others in more meaningful ways because of our personal journeys.

For me, I took time out to revitalise when I need to by taking a long walk on the beach, listening to uplifting musics, meditating, having a coffee with a special friend and sharing life with family.

A new Life

As you go on, you will experience a new kind of love and life. Nothing will replace the warmth, security, intimacy and glow of love that you shared with – your children, parents or loved one. Those beautiful memories will last our lifetime. However, there are folk in various situations who will need love and will give love in return. To me, when I am down, my therapy is to help someone else. The joy and fellowship of being there for others has significant benefits. It helps me to get over difficult personal hurdles of pain and loneliness. Being there for others will help you to learn and grow, as well as meeting new people.

Over time, you will be surprised to learn that you have developed new knowledge and skills and you will be so grateful for the victories of each day and the learning curves you have gone through. You will know you can and will survive and live a quality new life. You live the life the way you feel, no matter what you keep it real. Yes, it is time to do it on your own and now its time for you to take control.

Go out and About

You have to step out of your comfort zone and join many other local community groups for volunteering. I think, you will never look back. The companionship, fun, hard work and rewards that come from working in the community are profoundly just incredible. Many times, it will frequently remind you of good times you had with your loved one doing similar things and you can contribute again and have fun in a similar setting. It will bring unexpected source of personal fulfilment as according to Marianne Williamson, “We do not heal the past by dwelling there; we heal the past by living fully in the present”.

You will hold precious memories of your loved one. Their enriching of our lives remains an integral part of who we are now. We wish to laugh as long as we breath and love as long as we live. There will be still a special place for you in this life and we want to live it to the utmost. 

Personal Perspective

My wish is that you may find your special place and have inner joy, peace and total well being, as you also create new pathways. Always be sure you have fun and laugh a lot on the way, as you build a rewarding life that is uniquely YOU.

ABOUT ME


icgolina

Papua New Guinean living in Cairns, Australia. Weekend getaway adventurer and Free-Independent-Traveller (FIT). Lover of unique and exotic travel experiences with a touch of luxury. Follow me to my travel world, brining you closer to your destination.

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Christmas without loved-one but friends saves

Christmas means family gathering

Christmas Day well-spent with friends

Have you ever dreamt about having Christmas alone at home without any family members or friends? It can be easy to yes but when the actual day comes, you feel that little bit of loneliness creeping by. It has been my 30 years spending Christmas in Australia, almost 10 years without the loved-ones that has changed my life and families back home. I felt a little lost at first but sadly, I had to come to grasp with it and accept that life is always filled and full of surprises. This doesn’t meant that my celebrations won’t continue, it just meant that adapting to a new way of celebrating the season without family and loved ones.

Living in Australia, a country with many different faiths, however Christmas is still widely celebrated everywhere across the country. Whether they’re believers or not in what it stands for but it is a time for family gatherings around the table and opening those anticipated presents.

As I walk into any shopping centres, it is chaotic and all you hear is the voices of people in search for that perfect present. Christmas carols are heard throughout the shopping complex and yet, I still don’t feel the vide of the festive season approaching. It is a strange feeling and it doesn’t gives me an urge to buy a present for anyone nor either me receiving one.

The stores have been filled with huge range of Christmas trees and decorations and never ending Christmas carols. I haven’t had any second thought of decorating my home, not even my favourite decorations displayed. Leaving the thoughts behind I felt that, it is a much simpler affair with a bottle of whisky instead.

Christmas Day comes, the weather in Cairns is always very unpleasant with warm and humid temperatures which is unbearable for out parties and BBQs. My Christmas eve was quietly spent at home watching DVD’s and relaxing with my beautiful dog “Mindi” running around the lounge chasing each other. To others it may feel strange but to me, it is a very joyous moment to me and many more to come. 

Mindi

Christmas lunch

My Christmas Day morning was spent catching up with family and friends over the phone before heading to my friend’s place for Christmas lunch where I spend the day there. Yes, I was looking forward to a great lunch and the day was to be spent in the pool and relaxing with a good book.

My friends have always been good host to me over the years. John has always been the cook among them and he always puts his heart into a meal. It was going to be entertaining but there will be no crackers, presents, funny jokes or even wearing a silly hat. We will have good old records playing at the same time having the benefit of great views and ocean breezes. 

Our luncheon started off with few drinks before John brought our first course which was absolutely delicious. As I love seafood dishes, this appetiser with the mix of oysters, kilpatrick, prawns and crab meat – all home made, just made the beginning of the day even more worthy to celebrate. This then followed by home-made pumkin soup and roasted lamb ribs and mix vegetables. This was truly an perfect luncheon with good company.

Appetiser: Oysters, prawns and crab meat
Entree: Home-made pumpkin soup
Main: Roasted lamb-ribs and mix vegetables

Christmas Day is done and yes, everyone will be start looking forward to New Year’s Eve. That’s when the city of Cairns really comes alive and even in our sleepy neighbourhoods , the streets are humming with excitement. Most bars and restaurants are flooded with patrons, celebrating with live musics on every corner. The fireworks are amazing and by mid-night, the skies are lit up with colour and the esplanade is crowded with expats, locals and tourists all joining together to ring in the New Year. 

ABOUT ME


icgolina

Papua New Guinean living in Cairns, Australia. Weekend getaway adventurer and Free-Independent-Traveller (FIT). Lover of unique and exotic travel experiences with a touch of luxury. Follow me to my travel world, brining you closer to your destination.

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The street with no name is where my home is…

HOME


Go and love someone exactly as they are. And then watch how quickly they transform into the greatest, truest version of themselves. When one feels seen and appreciated in their own essence, one is instantly empowered – Wes Angelozzi.

People without a home

People without home is not a recent dilemma. It is one of the major problems faced by many countries globally and it is continuing to grow. I have documented many people living on the streets during my travels. Many times on the outskirts of Cairns city streets and parks, I have come in contact with many people from all different ethnic backgrounds. They have one thing in common – They’re all homeless people.

According to Australian Bureau of Statistic (ABS) shows that the number of homeless people in Australia have increased dramatically over the last five years. It is certainly that Cairns is no stranger to this homeless epidemic. According to the city of Cairns figures, number of people sleeping rough in Cairns have gone up 75 percent in the past two years. It is a dark, deep hidden world that is circulating right beneath our surface.

On my many visits to this homeless community, I have chatted with many homeless people on regular basis and there are others that I chat once and never see again. With no judgement, I presume they have moved on to a different location depending on their need within the homeless community social structure. They may have simply found a better home but it is very unlikely to be the case. I not only chat with them but I bring them food and clothing depending on how we carried out our conversation the evening before.

Am I doing good or wasting my time, is the question that can be controversial for many people to answer depending on how they view their own world. For me, nor am doing good or wasting my time. There are many people out there who are homeless whether it is by choice or not but it is the social interaction that I treasure more. Many homeless people feel lovely because of the way the society looks at them, according to many I have spoken with.

Living in Cairns, one of the most beautiful cities in Australia is a city that is flooded with millions of visitors each year. It has one of the Natural Wonders of the World on its doorstep – The Great Barrier Reef. Many visitors throughout the world come to the area to see the reef and tick it off their bucket-list. With thousands of visitors flogging the area, in the evenings along the esplanade, the waterfront footpath from the south of the esplanade to the north becomes a sea of people with tourists and locals. It is heavily used by people for exercise and those who just have a relaxing afternoon strolling along the waterfront before retiring. 

Taking a drive along the Cairns esplanade in the afternoon after work has become part of my normal evening ritual. It is pleasantly beautiful and relaxing atmosphere. I came across a homeless person who was feeding the wild pigeons at the same spot everyday. I took time to have a chat with him and listen to what he had to say irrespective of things that I didn’t agree or approved. I continued to listen to him attentively without any disagreement remarks. One of the things I have learnt over the years is that people who live alone and do not have any other social interaction, it is very important to be a good listener and agree with their views. This is a vulnerable time where they spit out their emotions and frustrations.

John who call himself and wants to be known as “Jungle John” is no stranger to living on the streets. He is homeless and lives on his old customised van the he calls “Home”. He is not a drug addict, not an alcoholic, not a gambler and has no diagnosed mental illness, but he is homeless. 

After having few conversation, he began to open up more about himself. He had a decorated career. He spent many years working both overseas and in Australia during his work years. He mainly worked up in the Gulf country – Northern Territory and Northern tip of Australian communities and mines. He had a family and a home in and around Atherton, Tablelands until his wife passed away and his children moved out of the family home and moved interstate for jobs. He sadly continued to state that this was the moment he never saw it coming. He was lonely and didn’t like the idea of paying electricity, rates and other expenses which were costing him a lot.

He decided, it was time to live on his customised van moving in and around from south to Townsville, north to Cooktown and west to Tablelands. He had lived this lifestyle for many years and wouldn’t go back to live in a permanent block home. He tried it once before but he still slept on the floor with the mattress, even though the comfortable bed was right next to him. He was terrified of using stoves, micro-oven and other modern equipments in the house. He said, the transition process of getting back to normal (as we call it) may be over. He is getting old and he is happy where he is now and taking pride in feeding this wild pigeons on daily basis as we continued our conversation.

As I listened to his story, I began to question myself. This is no different to what I hear from passengers that travel on the train but from different level of lifestyle. Many people that I spoke to sold their homes and live on their luxury camper-vans travelling around Australia following the sun. Many others have been travelling for 15-30 years without permanent homes while others are more adventurous and have enough finance to travel around the world with their cars being shipped to each destination. For John, he probably didn’t have enough cash to live on a luxury camper-van. This was the only way he could afford to live the lifestyle that he enjoys.

After having a cup of tea in his old enamel cup, I drove home thinking about John’s life journey. People might say, he choose to live this way and he is not homeless but to me, he is homeless as he didn’t choose live the way he is living now. The fact is that, he was driven out by both internal and external factors: the death of his wife which is uncontrollable, children leaving home leading to his loneliness and high cost of living – bills he couldn’t afford to pay.

Yes, anecdotal evidence from the Guardian-society suggests that the homeless demographic is changing: increasingly drugs and mental illness are not the sole drivers. Instead, the sheer un-affordability of housing and family violence is pushing people onto the street.

From Personal Perspective: I have learnt that I am not here to judge others and what I don’t want to be judged by others or similarly, do not judge a book by its cover. To me, little by little as we began to interact and understand why they do what they do, things become a little clearer to us little by little.

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